Well hello again flying friends and
welcome to another edition of… Now today’s edition of flyday facts is a little
bit different we’re not just sitting at home in my office we’re actually back in
Tango Delta Sierra because what I want to do today is talk to you about one of
the things that most people question the first time they ever see a Cirrus
aircraft. The thing that often raises the most controversy with other pilots
before they fly in a Cirrus for the first time. Yes that’s right it’s time to
talk about the Cirrus side stick or side yoke or yokey side stick or whatever
you decide to call it. So let me take you through what it is how it works and
exactly how do you arm the missiles on it pew-pew pew-pew pew-pew. So let me
take you through exactly how this thing works
let’s put 600 feet on the altimeter. So first things first just like most other
aircrafts and the training aircrafts that you’re used to the Cirrus side
stick is duplicated on the other side of the aircraft and if I make a movement
say I make a movement to the left here that’s also reflected over the other
side if I move to the right the same thing happens Now the basic operation is
exactly as you’d think pull back to go up push forward to go down left and right. Now one of the questions that often gets asked is where on the Cirrus do I trim
the aircraft? There’s nothing down here in the central panel this is where you’d
normally have it in a Warrior sometimes in some aircraft it’s up in the ceiling
but you don’t have it there so how exactly do you trim the Cirrus? Well it’s
actually dead easy the trim is all done by this missile guidance system looking
button up here and you can probably see the markings here – down up left and
right this four-way trim means that not only can you trim forwards and backwards
for your elevator but you do have left and right so you have aileron trim as
well. So then if you’re trimming using this you might be thinking well how do I
actually know where abouts I’m trimmed for example how do I trim for takeoff? Well
that’s where you move down to these markings here and these markings
actually show you how the aircraft is trimmed. If I pull the trim tab back what
will happen is the aircraft will then start to trim itself backwards slowly
until you get to the point which is marked T.O. or takeoff. What about
ailerons well the same thing happens here you have a left and right indicator
and all you do is you trim to the left for example in this case
and the yoke will move across and once it gets in the middle let go and you’re
trimmed for takeoff. Now as well as the trim tab the only other button we have to
worry about is this one. You can see PTT this is the push-to-talk this is how we
communicate with air traffic control. Now the other thing to note about the
constroll stick, constroll stick… now the other thing to note about the control stick
here in the Cirrus is it’s actually spring-loaded which means that whenever
it’s trimmed whenever you make an adjustment in the control stick and then
let go it will release itself back to the position it was last trimmed out. For
example here when the side stick’s trimmed out at this point if I pull back
and then gently let go you’ll see it releases back to its original position. Same way as if I push forward and then let go, same thing. Ailerons are the same. Now some people don’t like that but to be honest
I love it I think it’s really good it means that when you’re properly trimmed
out if you go through a little bit of turbulence say there’s a pitch up
movement and you need to push manually the control stick forwards all you do is
get back to the right levels slowly release and you know it will go back to
the last position it was trimmed out. And so there you have it that’s the Cirrus
side stick it’s not that complicated after all it’s actually really
straightforward especially here in the SR20. I really like using it let me know
your thoughts down below my question today for flyday facts is have you flown
the side stick and if so do you prefer it to the central control yoke? Let me
know in the comments below what you think. And that’s it for another flyday facts thank you very much for watching I hope you found that useful if you’re not
a member of the channel already and you haven’t subscribed then join the pilot
community click that subscribe button below. If you enjoyed this video give us
a like it means a lot to know that you’re enjoying the content otherwise
have a great weekend thanks as always for watching and I’ll catch you again
soon

Cirrus side stick – how does it work?

40 thoughts on “Cirrus side stick – how does it work?

  • November 30, 2017 at 6:58 pm
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    This week's Flyday Facts Question: Have you flown the side stick – and if so do you prefer it to the central control yoke?

    Reply
  • November 30, 2017 at 7:01 pm
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    Don't most Cirrus's have a normal yoke or do they all have the control sticks. I'd rather a yoke because I have more control but I like both!

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  • November 30, 2017 at 7:11 pm
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    Hi nice vids mate im watching from the other side of the world in the uk!

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  • November 30, 2017 at 7:48 pm
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    I was concerned about the side stick when I was thinking about buying my SR22. But it’s just so natural now that you don’t even notice.
    It is so nice not having a yoke in your lap area when flying. The spring loading doesn’t bother me at all.

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  • November 30, 2017 at 8:54 pm
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    I transitioned from a 172 to an SR20 earlier this year and also prefer the side yoke. It's very natural since it has the movement of a yoke versus a stick, and it's great to be able to have the area in front of you clear for more cockpit space. My passengers also love the extra room.

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  • November 30, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    I fly a 20 – I really like the side stick -it feels natural and the spring loading is a non-issue – you simply relax and let the yoke centre itself. I find the aileron trim somewhat aggressive and the only time I seem to use it is when trimming out for takeoff….

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  • November 30, 2017 at 9:49 pm
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    Love it I have flown a Y stick an it is so much easier to land an always grease the landings with it

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  • November 30, 2017 at 10:46 pm
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    IM actually looking forward to it – Stefan I know youve recomended a SR20/22 instructor (cant remember which vid) can you let me know where who and possibly a contact number? Also whats involved in the transition (course certification ) from say a cessna to cirrus?

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  • December 1, 2017 at 12:46 am
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    Great explanation of the stick. I think this one is unique because of the way it comes out of the dash on the side compared to other sticks. I wonder if you use the aileron trim very much ?? I've never tried a stick but i have heard some pilots say that it makes controlling the plane easier than a yoke, although others prefer to STICK with a yoke. Enjoy your weekend Stick, ahh sorry i meant Stef

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  • December 1, 2017 at 12:47 am
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    I'll take stick over yoke EVERYTIME. I started flying with right hand stick and left hand on throttle and I've never felt comfortable using yoke in the left and throttle in the right.

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  • December 1, 2017 at 12:56 am
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    Flown with a centre stick (DA40 and DA42) and a traditional yoke (C172/C205). Have yet to try a side stick though.

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  • December 1, 2017 at 3:37 am
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    I've flown the Foxbat which is a centre stick, so by default it's a sidestick. Didn't like it. I think the cirrus would be alright though since the movement would be the same as the left hand on the yoke of a Cessna which I grew up with. The sky certainly doesn't look like that today (actually being Friday ha ha ha )

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  • December 1, 2017 at 4:21 am
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    I have not flown one but one question is what do you do if you have an electric trim failure or trim runaway? There is no manual option as in a Bonanza, Worrior etc.- Mike Costello

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  • December 1, 2017 at 7:13 am
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    I sure have! As I mentioned in the last video, I love the sidestick. I find it easier to make the little corrections, and the electric trim is lovely

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  • December 1, 2017 at 10:33 am
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    Never used one but it looks good with all the trim functions. Good explanation. (Q – is the other circular button, above the trim, a blank for something else?)

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  • December 2, 2017 at 2:03 am
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    Loving your videos Stefan! It’s great to see an Australian making some quality and entertaining aviation videos. Keep up the excellent work!

    Reply
  • December 13, 2017 at 10:46 pm
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    I've decided to follow purely on the fact that the missile pew pews were awesome!

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  • December 15, 2017 at 1:06 pm
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    I have a Cirrus SR-22 and love the side stick. I have flown center stick, and traditional yoke, side if the best. The cirrus did a great job with ergonomics and the side stick is very natural and comfortable.

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  • December 17, 2017 at 11:47 am
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    would be great to see how the "handlebars" are connected to the control surfaces. whats the mechanical advantage? wrists arent all that strong.

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  • February 28, 2018 at 2:00 pm
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    A left-hand side-stick forces you to fly left handed from the left seat. What if you're an amputee? Still legal to fly, but you won't be flying a Cirrus airplane from the left seat. Not a problem in standard yoke or stick airplanes.

    It would also seem strange (to me) – to control movements for banking , you have to learn to twist left and right, rather than the standard (and intuitive) up/down yoke movements for banking. After having learned muscle-memory up/down movements during basic flight training, having to re-learn that muscle memory for left/right twisting to control bank seems uncomfortable. How much harder would it have been for Cirrus to simply provide a standard yoke really? If they wanted to keep the behind-panel area open for avionics, then they could have used a control-column through the floor (carbon fiber anyone). The weight difference wouldn't have been such a mitigating factor. The airplane is so powerful, it would not have made any noticeable difference.

    My guess is that the millennials that designed the Cirrus wanted to be innovative about creating a "design-upset" that would up-end the conventional airplane-design crowd. I might see using a sidestick if the airplane was a fly-by-wire design , but it isn't, and probably never will be.

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  • March 10, 2018 at 9:17 am
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    Love your channel! if you ever at Tyabb let us know!

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  • April 5, 2018 at 9:48 am
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    My fine motor skill in my left hand is pants compared to my right. Not sure it would feel comfortable to me. Left handers will like it no doubt.

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  • April 5, 2018 at 10:46 am
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    Center yoke better

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  • April 5, 2018 at 11:27 am
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    2:38 – umm, that’s what trim does… haha

    The only difference between spring trims and and aerodynamic trims is that the trim position effects the controls on ground, with no airflow.

    Otherwise they operate the same in the air – relax pressure, and the controls will return to where they were last trimmed.

    Nothing different going on here.

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  • May 2, 2018 at 6:14 am
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    How about flying right seat (for a right handed person preference) so you end up with left hand throttle and right hand stick?

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  • May 13, 2018 at 3:30 am
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    Yes Ive flown the side stick and I really Like it!!

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  • May 16, 2018 at 8:41 pm
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    Is it more comfortable to fly with the side stick sitting on the right side of the cockpit or while sitting on the left side of the cockpit? I asked cuz I'm right-handed and I feel like it would be easier to fly from the right side seat by putting my right hand on the stick.

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  • June 9, 2018 at 11:35 pm
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    The question is not so much the method of control. It is more whether it is centre, right or left. I know many pilots who admit to being far more competent with a right side centre stick and left hand on the throttle. That fits with most people (overwhelmingly) being right handed. There is no rational reason why left seat should be the pilot in command seat. Personally I hate everything about the Cirrus. The list is endless. I hate that side stick but I would hate it less if PIC could be accepted as being on the right side. The other thing I do not like is the claimed "gentle" stall (outside wing delayed max AOA). I'd rather get early notice of the stall with a conventional wing. Late outside wing edge stall gives a false sense of security.

    Apart from that, though I acknowledge many like the Cirrus, I find it utterly soulless, from the washing machine engine sound, to the panel, to the side stick, to the ridiculously expensive price for a very unimpressive performance given the expense. I would have more fun in a cheap tail dragger.

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  • August 11, 2018 at 7:54 pm
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    For fighter aircraft some will argue that under high g loads it is easier to use a side stick then a traditional centre stick. Sure might be true for some. But in my opinion when u sit down ur hands rest in ur lap naturally and also in case ur right hand gets injured during combat u can always fly a centre stick left hand in emergency situations. Centre stick in fighter aircraft is an absolute must have in my opinion. A fighter pilot in combat should use both hands on a centre stick for high g maneuvers- alowing flexing, tensing the muscles throughout the aggressive maneuvers. It is a fight up there after all and u want ur blood pumping, u have to be able to get agresive physically in the cockpit to help the heart pump blood better to ur brain.
    With a side stick only thing that is getting agressive is ur wrist flexors ! This is not good for ur wrist health at all over long periods of time. Operating centre stick uses ur shoulder and entire arm muscles more then just ur wrist flexors. Leading to prolonged limb health over all.
    The side stick is a must ban on military aircraft in my opinion. It should only be used on civil smaller private aircraft for nothing more then relaxing flights for sight seeing.

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  • August 12, 2018 at 12:40 pm
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    ConTROversy?

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  • August 26, 2018 at 2:06 pm
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    0:39 “Pew pew.. pew pew pew pew..” 😂😂

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  • September 7, 2018 at 7:45 pm
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    As you know I've been wanting to learn to fly in a Cirrus, but many have tried to steer me away from it. Someone told me that it's hard to tell when the plane is about to stall with the spring loaded control. Is there any truth to that? Thanks!

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  • October 22, 2018 at 6:42 pm
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    Don't you have a huge parallax error with that aileron trim indication?

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  • November 13, 2018 at 8:17 pm
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    I plan to buy a Cirrus and am constantly amazed with the innovations Cirrus has come up with. As a former Military pilot, the side stick should be preferable!

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  • November 17, 2018 at 10:33 pm
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    It works by dumbing down the pilot. Kind of like a commie bus.

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  • November 26, 2018 at 3:55 am
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    I just had my first flight lesson in an SR 20 at 14 and I thought the side stick was most comfortable even though I’m a righty

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  • January 21, 2019 at 11:12 am
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    Why do you move your hands so much when speaking ? ?

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  • May 2, 2019 at 3:30 pm
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    what about tail rudder ? Pedals ?

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  • July 6, 2019 at 6:32 pm
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    What is back-up procedure for side stick failure?

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  • July 7, 2019 at 12:19 am
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    What to do if you a dominantly right handed?

    Reply

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