I’m gonna try to demonstrate something called regelation. Which is where you provide a pressure onto ice and that turns it into water but after that pressure is removed it freezes again So, in order to demonstrate this I’ve taken apart the high E string from my guitar. I chose the E string because it’s thinner than a G string and that’s important. And I’ve weighted it with these two bottles of water. When I apply the string across the ice we should see the wire start to cut through the ice And perform the regelation of the ice. where we’ll see if it works because we are outside in Sydney and it’s warmer than 0°C obviously. All right, it’s past 3 A.M. but the experiment has been a success I passed this wire through this giant block of ice And it ‘s still a solid block. You can actually see the point where the wire went through, here. So, we pretty clearly demonstrated regelation. The idea that you can compress the ice, turn it into water and then when that pressure is gone it solidifies again as ice. Pretty cool stuff.

Does Pressure Melt Ice?
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100 thoughts on “Does Pressure Melt Ice?

  • July 16, 2019 at 4:24 pm
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    well we know what it is …. now for the why it happens.

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  • July 17, 2019 at 12:22 am
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    As long as it took to cut thru this didn't prove that it re freezes instantly

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  • July 17, 2019 at 1:23 am
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    Thicccccc accent there mateeeee

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  • July 17, 2019 at 10:19 am
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    Well this was… Underwhelming

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  • July 17, 2019 at 2:25 pm
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    Yeah. Or the wire is getting warm from outside and melts the ice. After that, water flows into the cut and freezes because of the ice on both sides.

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  • July 17, 2019 at 6:54 pm
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    Wow, straight to the point.. every video should be like this

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  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
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    Warren G joined the chat…then he see's his homie Nate Dog bout to regUlate

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  • July 18, 2019 at 12:46 am
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    You just used an e-string so you could have an excuse to say g-string

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  • July 18, 2019 at 2:20 am
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    Or it refroze back to itself?

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  • July 18, 2019 at 9:55 am
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    In French, we could say "Il a inventé le fil à couper la glace"
    "He invented the ice-cutting string", variation on the expression "Il n'a pas inventé le fil à couper le beurre" ("He did not invent the butter-cutting string") which means "he is stupid". (My variation being without the "ne pas" negation, it means of course the opposite)

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  • July 18, 2019 at 9:58 am
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    Is there an equilibrium point with relation to ambient temperature and the force required for regelation? Does this work because ice is less dense than water from the lattice?

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  • July 18, 2019 at 11:59 pm
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    Is there a significant difference between applying pressure to ice that can't escape to ice that can flow away sidewards?

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  • July 19, 2019 at 3:51 am
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    this has such an unreasonable amount of flaws in it. its warm out, everything is different temperatures, the conductivity of the string, re-solidifying.

    the proper way to do this experiment. Put EVERYTHING in a 0 C chamber. wait for the wire to get to 0. THEN place the wire on the ice. The thing here is metal has a much higher thermal conductivity than water/ice. That means it absorbs and transfers heat far faster than the ice. What we watched in the video was the string taking the heat from the atmosphere and transferring it to the block of ice to melt it. NOT the pressure melting the ice. Then the energy stored inside of the block of ice re solidified the near freezing water.

    such an amazingly flawed experiment that is in no way, shape, or form, scientific.

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  • July 19, 2019 at 8:33 am
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    What if it's just cold welding?

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  • July 19, 2019 at 5:09 pm
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    Actually 9 ice under pressure becomes packed ice and 9 packed ice under pressure becomes blue ice.

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  • July 19, 2019 at 10:25 pm
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    The thumbnail has make me a bit confused

    rege

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  • July 20, 2019 at 4:56 am
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    So after this if we try to break ice with barehands or punch will it crack from same spot.?
    I mean will the strength of ice block will reduce from the surface where it was cut by wire..?

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  • July 20, 2019 at 4:59 pm
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    This is dumb. If you put weight on a string and put the string on your finger it will hurt, and you might even get a cut. You're not made of ice, are you? Also how do we know that it melts because of heat in the string. Aaaaand pressurized water forms ice. You get get ice 7, aka warm ice, which can be found on the bottom of some water planets, and it's literally ice just because of the pressure the water is exposed to.the molecules of water vapor are not dense at all, meaning they're spaced out, liquid water molecules are decently close together, and ice molecules are very tightly spaced

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  • July 21, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    lol how stoned were ya in the outro

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  • July 21, 2019 at 12:20 pm
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    Hydraulic press channel where you at?

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  • July 21, 2019 at 6:52 pm
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    Why dose ice melt fast when it touches aluminum

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  • July 21, 2019 at 6:59 pm
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    How does the experiment demonstrate that the ice 'melts' as opposed to being 'cut' through?

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  • July 21, 2019 at 10:13 pm
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    WHAT IS THAT SONG AND WHY DO I RECOGNIZE IT

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  • July 21, 2019 at 10:23 pm
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    my man Veritasium lookin high as a kite at the end of the video

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  • July 22, 2019 at 11:04 am
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    I know this video is old but I have a question. If we put water in vaccum it starts to boil is it possible to freeze it with pressure? Or is it a wrong question?

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  • July 22, 2019 at 4:49 pm
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    Why not this ice malt entirely ? I mean this experiment takes lot's of time ?

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  • July 26, 2019 at 11:02 am
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    So the heat transferred through the metal and the ice refroze where the wire was.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 6:31 pm
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    string temperature melted ice, ice temperature from both sides bonded it again

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  • July 26, 2019 at 11:58 pm
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    This is consistent with ice skates that slide on water.

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  • July 28, 2019 at 6:42 pm
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    you're pretty cool stuff

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  • July 29, 2019 at 9:16 am
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    Thats not atmospheric pressure which i was expecting

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  • August 2, 2019 at 8:28 pm
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    Is this how that cola slush trick works where you shake the bottle to produce a high pressure then freeze it and it’s still a liquid when you take it out of the freezer, and only becomes solid when you open the bottle and release the pressure?

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  • August 2, 2019 at 9:14 pm
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    This winter I will conduct some of my own tests by garroting every snowman I see.

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  • August 7, 2019 at 10:12 am
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    I noticed this when I was young, you can squeeze an icecube really hard and it starts to drip a fair bit, and it can't refreeze if it all runs off lol

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  • August 17, 2019 at 1:32 pm
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    Oh.., so this is the reason why I sweat.

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  • August 19, 2019 at 6:41 pm
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    G-string 🤣

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  • August 19, 2019 at 9:18 pm
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    anyone ever get that feeling from the video that he used to have a slight australian accent that isnt there anymore

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  • August 20, 2019 at 1:09 am
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    starts yelling at ice

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  • August 24, 2019 at 12:55 am
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    *whispering* why are we whispering?

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  • August 24, 2019 at 6:13 am
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    Hi. Thanks to you folks can ice skate. I wonder what the structure of "passed through" is, or why it's visible.

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  • August 25, 2019 at 1:17 pm
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    Man do you even know how expensive bubble free clear ice is ?

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  • August 29, 2019 at 4:40 am
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    I don't trust it

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  • August 31, 2019 at 10:44 am
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    Does pressure meth ice?

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  • August 31, 2019 at 9:28 pm
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    Ahhh, it’s the chessnetwork jingle! Does anyone know the name of the song playing during the time-lapse?

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  • September 1, 2019 at 5:09 am
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    What if string is Thick enough … So.. lager area b/w two cutted peices?

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  • September 1, 2019 at 6:12 am
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    Is this why when freezing a bottle of water it can sometimes be taken out as a liquid and then upon squeezing the bottle it very quickly freezes? The pressure created from the water expanding as it freezes regelates it and a final squeeze and the reduction of pressure after the squeeze causes it to freeze before my eyes?

    The answer to this phenomenon would make a great video.

    Thanks for posting interesting videos that answers questions I've never asked myself and often leave me wondering more. 👍

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  • September 1, 2019 at 4:15 pm
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    No, high pressure freezes water. 😉

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  • September 2, 2019 at 1:00 pm
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    pretty sure its just refreezing because the walls of ice either side the cut are below 0

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  • September 2, 2019 at 5:01 pm
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    Thats stupid cuz have you ever put two ice cubes next to each other

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  • September 2, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    So does that mean my skin can go through reagilation?

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  • September 2, 2019 at 8:24 pm
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    or heat melted it and the ice refrozeitself.

    dont matter whatfancy words you puton it, just heat n cold

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  • September 2, 2019 at 8:52 pm
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    Should have used a material for the string with a lower termal conductivity than air. Because this way we don't know if the pressure Is melting the ice or the fact that the ice close to the string Is getting more heat…

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  • September 3, 2019 at 2:49 am
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    Was that ice ❄ keept in room temperature while performing the experiment

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  • September 3, 2019 at 12:14 pm
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    lol how he was way more relaxed because he was tired

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  • September 3, 2019 at 12:28 pm
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    Theres a difference between setting a whole block under pressure and completely melting it, then removing the pressure and having it freeze again – compared to slicing through a block with a wire and having the surrounding ice freezing the water to ice again…. just saying.

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  • September 3, 2019 at 5:56 pm
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    this proves 9/11 was an inside job

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  • September 3, 2019 at 6:57 pm
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    I'm confused? Isn't this just cutting the ice? Like a heavy knife and butter

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  • September 3, 2019 at 9:13 pm
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    could be that the ice that was not melted just froze the liquid part

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  • September 3, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Cool beans

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  • September 4, 2019 at 9:32 am
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    Ok now put it in a pressure chamber

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  • September 5, 2019 at 5:46 am
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    This is so fake

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  • September 5, 2019 at 2:19 pm
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    That's basically how skis/snowboards work.

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  • September 5, 2019 at 6:59 pm
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    But why?

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  • September 6, 2019 at 2:35 am
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    This happens all the time in the polar regions. Pressure fractures re-freeze.

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  • September 6, 2019 at 12:59 pm
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    Metal also melts ice fast so try with a plastic wire instead

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  • September 7, 2019 at 2:46 pm
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    The experimant as you did it doesn't proove regelation. The string may be conducting heat from the room to the ice and melt it.
    To proove regelation you need to repeat this experiment at a temperature below 0 °C

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  • September 7, 2019 at 8:29 pm
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    Space between blocks was so close that water freeze again

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  • September 8, 2019 at 6:24 am
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    It may have been Bette to demonstrate it with a weight that is also below freezing so that it rules out any question of heat conductivity by the wire

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  • September 9, 2019 at 11:20 pm
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    I would not assume that pressure was the only contributing factor here. That guitar string may be conducting thermal heat and it may pick up subtle sounds waves and even ulf. So I would say that pressure, temperature conductivity, and perhaps minor vibration were the cause. If you want to prove that pressure melts ices then use something with less conductivity or more similar to the ice itself. This experiment was not entirely useful for that reason.

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  • September 10, 2019 at 11:18 am
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    not an accurate experiment, since water on the surface (where the cut was) surrounded by the ice, which cools down it to the point where it again became ice.
    So hard to say is it pressure release effect or just heat exchange.

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  • September 13, 2019 at 5:57 pm
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    i was expecting a hydraulic press of some sort..

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  • September 19, 2019 at 6:01 am
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    No you did not demonstrate what you said. Too many variables heat in stroing cold from remaining ice. There is clearly a cut. Any ice will merge back together may be true but not demonstrated here.

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  • September 20, 2019 at 5:57 am
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    Mate I am in Sydney and it is higher than 0 so yeh. Click bait

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  • September 21, 2019 at 3:30 pm
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    Hehe, the G string

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  • September 22, 2019 at 2:02 am
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    i can't be the only one who finds him super attractive ahha

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  • September 24, 2019 at 2:06 pm
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    @Veritasium i think the Water just freezes again because of the the other ice around it

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  • September 25, 2019 at 3:02 pm
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    ummmm what about the temperature variance of the exposed wire? The wire closest to the edge will transfer heat to the outside edge to start the process. Not saying what you did isnt correct but it doesn't take a lot of heat to melt ice.

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  • September 25, 2019 at 8:38 pm
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    this doesnt prove anything tbh…
    it might also be that the ice is just cold enough to refreeze the water after the cut and also thatthe string warms up by enviromental warmth.
    this proof seems flawed to me

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  • September 26, 2019 at 4:38 pm
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    Fake, try with nylon string

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  • September 26, 2019 at 10:58 pm
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    Rege

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  • September 27, 2019 at 12:02 am
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    What was the temperature of the wire

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  • September 27, 2019 at 12:53 am
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    how to make transparent ice?

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  • September 27, 2019 at 2:07 am
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    That’s really cool

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  • September 27, 2019 at 11:53 am
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    yeah, no

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  • September 27, 2019 at 1:25 pm
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    i swear some guy is gonna make a piece of art out of that, somehow

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  • September 27, 2019 at 4:43 pm
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    cool stuff!

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  • September 28, 2019 at 6:40 am
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    WHATS THE SONG AT 0:35 PLZ

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  • September 28, 2019 at 7:49 am
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    ask it when its gonna get married and have kids and see

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  • September 28, 2019 at 9:19 am
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    Pretty cool stuff

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  • September 28, 2019 at 12:34 pm
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    I know the string is pretty thin, but it still has some heat conductivity. This might not be the best set up. Maybe fishing wire would show better.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 12:51 pm
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    Yea

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  • September 28, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Thats one way to make $10k sure helps being famous

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 5:07 pm
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    one thing I don't understand. How are we sure that the sorrounding ice isn't simply re-melting the water? How do we know it's the release of pressure?

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  • September 28, 2019 at 8:14 pm
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    Not convinced by this experiment

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  • September 28, 2019 at 10:36 pm
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    Hey! Vsauce – Michael here…..

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:53 am
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    meh
    it solidifies again cos it's ice

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:03 am
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    Well that was rather short. I was expecting you to challenge the idea and go into a mindblowing explanation why this commonly held belief is wrong, as you do.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:36 pm
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    6,4 mil but really cheap video !!!

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 6:01 pm
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    kkkk vídeo merda, tira isso do ar, ta ensinando burrice ao jovens, se vc por mais pressão no gelo ele simplesmente vai ficar mais duro, se vc tirar a pressão ele vai virar água, bota essa merda numa camâra a vácuo e faz a pressão dela ser menor q a pressão atmosférica pra gente ver a realidade

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 9:11 pm
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    Cool stuff

    Reply

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