Saving us from soaking, scraping and scrubbing,
Teflon has been a lifesaver (or at least a hand-saver) for home cooks for the last 50
years. Comprised of a unique polymer that actually
repels nearly every other material (the only known thing a gecko’s feet can’t stick
to), the processes used to get this substance to adhere so well to a pan relies on sand,
heat, a vacuum and sometimes even another chemical. For the uninitiated, as noted previously,
Teflon was created by accident in 1938 in Dupont’s Jackson Lab. Dr. Roy J. Plunkett had been playing around
with refrigerants and compressed and froze a sample of tetrafluoroethylene which spontaneously
polymerized. The waxy result of that experiment was polytetrafluoroethylene
(PTFE). Inert and, for a long time, “considered
the most slippery material in existence,” PTFE became known as Teflon in 1945. The trouble with Teflon is that PTFE is a
fluorinated polymer – a long chain of identical molecules. The molecules are comprised of carbon and
fluorine, enmeshed in one of the most powerful bonds known, with the carbon atoms surrounded
by a “tight helix of fluorine atoms.” Along with this super-tight bond, fluorine
also naturally repels other elements, and together, these two properties keep things
from sticking to Teflon. Because repulsion happens in all directions,
it would be impossible to get Teflon to stick to a pan without help, and there are a few
different ways this is done. One method, said to be used for Dupont’s
Silverstone brand, begins by sandblasting the pan, creating an uneven surface that encourages
adherence. A primer layer of Teflon is sprayed on, then
baked at high heat that helps the Teflon get “a secure mechanical grip.” Note that this is a mechanical, and not chemical,
adherence that some have characterized as similar to the way ice cubes get stuck in
a tray or Velcro binds together. Depending on whom you ask about Dupont’s
process, the initial sticking is followed by one or two more rounds of spraying and
baking before the pan is considered finished. A second method also bakes the Teflon onto
the pan (called “sintering”), but first involves subjecting it to a barrage of ions
in a “high vacuum under electric field.” This forces some of the bonds holding fluorine
atoms to break, allowing the carbon underneath to bond to other materials, like oxygen, which
allows it to stick to the pan. The third method is similar to the second,
except that the changes to one side of the Teflon are done with a reducing agent that
breaks the strong bonds between the fluorine and the carbon allowing the fluorine to bond
together. This leaves the carbon free. The free carbon, which forms into unsaturated
hydrocarbons, is sticky enough to get the Teflon sheet to stick to a pan.

How Do They Get Teflon to Stick to Pans?

100 thoughts on “How Do They Get Teflon to Stick to Pans?

  • November 17, 2017 at 4:32 pm
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    2ND

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:33 pm
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    THE BUNGHOLE

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:37 pm
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    Blevins, Hiskey, et al .. this was a piss poor job … has no "jen no say kwa" at all !!

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:38 pm
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    last time i was early Trump was still a meme

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:40 pm
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    Magic and stuff

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:40 pm
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    Bring Daven back! He's gotten a lot better in front of the camera.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:41 pm
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    From my experience I imagine it's a mixture of bacon, egg and oil at hob level 3 for 20 minutes

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:43 pm
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    I have a video idea: Is medicine with an expiration date still good after the expiration date? Will the effects still be as good as gold before the expiration date, or will it get gradually weaker?

    Reply
  • November 17, 2017 at 4:47 pm
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    By poisoning the water in West Virginia

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    Forget Teflon pans , they peel over time and pieces start getting in your food (it’s not good to eat plastic lol). Stick with ceramic coated pans for a better and safer non stick pan , or just get some stainless pans.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    Not much of an explanation…

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:53 pm
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    17th 😉

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:53 pm
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    I think this was pretty good! I also think it could be better if there wasn’t a video every single day, I just feel like to do the research well and write a script for the episode and to film it needs more time if you want good quality

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:54 pm
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    A Wizard did it.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:54 pm
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    Can you tell me if any products are produced when Teflon pans are heated? I know Teflon pans to be toxic to birds. (Birds in the presence of heated Teflon pans will nosebleed and succumb in days.)

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  • November 17, 2017 at 4:56 pm
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    you can also use chemical abrasion to get it to stick and it can be applied as either an additive to liquid paint(in this case the oven operation has double duty of baking off the paint additives to leave a coat of teflon) or with electrostatic powder coating(the finely ground polymer powder is given a positive charge and blown towards the grounded metal part with a weird type of spray gun). and by high heat he means 650-850 F. I did some PTFE coating for medical tools.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:03 pm
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    today i found out when my roommate leaves for work is the best time to get intimate with myself

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:03 pm
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    Michael is that you

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:04 pm
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    Do earphones tangle themselves up?

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:06 pm
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    I suppose I can go find out from the playlist of how teflons are made but you guys mentioned you had a video but didn't link to it. I just feel you guys should and not my laziness talking.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:06 pm
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    Teflon pans are great, but once you go Cast Iron you never go back.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:19 pm
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    Boing, flick

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:19 pm
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    "How Do They Get Teflon to Stick to Pans?"

    They don't. That's why it always ends up in your food.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:22 pm
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    Woll has a product that they claim to uses diamond a coating which they claim is metal utensil safe, dishwasher safe, and oven safe up to 260c/500f.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:23 pm
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    Teflon sticks? I, myself, prefer teflon crisps.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:37 pm
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    i already knew that Simon! I'm way super smart!

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:40 pm
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    Get real pans.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:48 pm
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    Well… They do it bad, because it sticks to my food better.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 5:54 pm
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    Use cast iron, fools. Teflon is just a trick to make you buy the same pans over and over and over again. Cast iron works better and it will still be working better hundreds of years after you are dead. Teflon does not solve a problem in the kitchen, it solves a problem in DuPont's corporate board rooms.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:03 pm
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    No ads in this video ! YAY !

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:08 pm
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    Turn on your captions he add little fact he doesn't say like so people can see

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:16 pm
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    Bet my Seasoned Cast Iron will out outperform any nonstick cookware.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:16 pm
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    Teflon is very bad for cooking . Use polished stainless steel its non stick all so.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:20 pm
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    A Fluoridated polymer isn't a long chain of identical molecules, in contradiction to the statement at 1:00
    As first of, Fluoridated polymers can be any polymer that has fluorid in it. This could be anything from Sugar to Fat, to any other polymer.
    Secondly, the repetition of the carbon fluorid pair is true, but the whole chain is the molecule. These molecules are though not making a chain as a group, but rather just a tangled mess similar to spaghetti.

    Though, it is true that Teflon is a fluoridated polymer chain of an arbitrary length. But it would be nice to not have the term molecule used so freely outside its definition.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:21 pm
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    This is actually simple. They're applying it to steel in most cases. Steel is not anti-stick.

    The real question is how do they get the pan to stick to the teflon?

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:27 pm
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    my last view as a sub . support what you do and wish u the best sir .digital high five

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:36 pm
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    Why does Teflon always come off pans so easily. Should be the question. Even on high quality pans.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:39 pm
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    Cancer pans

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:45 pm
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    Nice short video

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  • November 17, 2017 at 6:47 pm
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    It is amazing that I have gone my whole life without ever wondering about this. The second I saw the title I thought 🤔 why did I never ask this question before & had to watch. Great video. 🙂

    Reply
  • November 17, 2017 at 7:48 pm
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    fluorine sure is an impressive element. Perhaps a video on its many uses and how insanely dangerous fluorine gas and the like is?

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  • November 17, 2017 at 8:13 pm
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    1) Most "teflon"-pans don't contain teflon any more, as it has been replaced by the more resilient polythiophenylene
    2) the Fluor atoms are not forming a helice around the carbon chain in Teflon.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 8:27 pm
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    love shorter videos

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  • November 17, 2017 at 8:27 pm
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    I still season my pans the old fashioned way.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    "Comprised of" is not a part of the English language.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 9:15 pm
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    Anyone know what reducing agent can reduce a C-F bond?

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  • November 17, 2017 at 9:59 pm
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    they don't… darn coating is always flaking off.
    inb4 someone figures out all these bits of pan people eat cause cancer…

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  • November 17, 2017 at 10:36 pm
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    How do actors manage to fake sex in sex scenes without getting excited by mistake?

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  • November 17, 2017 at 10:42 pm
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    WHY DO WE STICK OUR TONGUE OUT WHEN WE ARE FOCUSED?

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  • November 17, 2017 at 11:57 pm
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    Just because it is a non-stick doesn't always mean that oil is no longer necessary. I still need oil in cooking food to properly mix the ingredients.

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  • November 18, 2017 at 1:04 am
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    I wish my wife had a Teflon pan the other night! She was frying some chicken and it got burnt in the pan… I had the fun job of trying to clean it off! LOL!

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  • November 18, 2017 at 1:46 am
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    SOOOOOO……
    WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU HEAT AND EAT OFF OF IT!!!???????

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  • November 18, 2017 at 2:08 am
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    In my experience a properly seasoned cast iron pan is much easier to clean. (while it is still hot scrape it out with a metal spatula and wipe out the rest of the debris with a rag and you are good to go)

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  • November 18, 2017 at 2:20 am
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    Who down voted this? Seriously… Why!?!? WHY MUST YOU BE SO CRUEL TO SIMON AND THE NON-STICK PANS YOU MONSYERS!!???!?

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 2:23 am
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    I didn't know I wanted to know that…

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  • November 18, 2017 at 3:42 am
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    Should do a video on hydrofloric antonic acid.

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  • November 18, 2017 at 4:07 am
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    Industrial PTFE sheet with a back etched layer is common as slip surfaces in machinery, where the brown back surface is there from the ion etching to allow adhesives to bond to the surface to allow you to stick them down to a backing surface. Otherwise you have to drill and use mechanical fasteners to hold down the sheet, or use a thick sheet of PTFE and clamp it down. The front surface is slippery, the back not so. However it has reduced heat resistance, but is commonly used as a backing to apply pressure to heat sealing, like in a bag manufacturing line, where you have a hot bar forming one seal in a bag, then it is filled with things like sweets and then hot sealed top and bottom using another hot bar and cutter to separate the packs.

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 4:18 am
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    Somehow I thought that

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  • November 18, 2017 at 5:51 am
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    The things I never knew I never knew…

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 5:59 am
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    The comments on this video are hilarious

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  • November 18, 2017 at 6:54 am
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    Anyone read Teflon in Spanish?

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  • November 18, 2017 at 8:32 am
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    It’s ironic that a substance is made by accident and is so slippery that attachment to a desired surface is an ordeal of chemical engineering.

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  • November 18, 2017 at 9:51 am
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    https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/teflon-and-perfluorooctanoic-acid-pfoa.html

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  • November 18, 2017 at 9:53 am
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    Didn't they ban Teflon? I haven't seen any of it in years. Just the new fad of all these "copper" pans. Not that I'd buy Teflon anyway since I noticed years ago it peeled and black stuff was getting in my food. I know that can't be good. Also, things just didn't cook well on it, especially eggs. I'm as lazy as the next person when it comes to cleaning dishes, but I'm also a very picky cook. And even if Teflon was perfectly safe, I'd still stick to a stainless steel and cast iron pan for the things I prefer to make.

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 10:23 am
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    Always enjoy these videos but miss the little peek of chest we used to get with them

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 11:11 am
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    AND NOW FOR ANOTHER BONUS FACT

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  • November 18, 2017 at 1:29 pm
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    If my nostrils were made of teflon, I'd never have to pick my nose.

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  • November 18, 2017 at 1:43 pm
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    However under high temperatures, ptfe off gasses fluorine gas. Teflon claim it to be 600c but other studies suggest it to be closer to 350c. The fluoride being removed in this manor explains why they loose their hydrophobic nature over time.

    That being said, I don't believe Teflon to be toxic because when not heated, it is inert and who the hell heats their pans to melting point?

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 2:13 pm
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    i didn't know where to put this but i like your channel and i had a question….how long would a gogleplex of planck lengths be?

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 2:23 pm
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    When was fish oil capsules invented? I just saw an ad from 1932, and I didn't expect that.

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  • November 18, 2017 at 2:27 pm
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    I just figured out that Simon and Michael from V sauce are different people, always thought this was the same guy, hahaha.

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 3:13 pm
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    I do not like Teflon because it comes off the pans… so where CAN it go? Into our food… no thank you! How about some "ceramic" information?

    Reply
  • November 18, 2017 at 8:58 pm
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    Now, explain they they get 'super glue' not to gum up the manufacturing machines much less the bottle filling

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  • November 18, 2017 at 9:18 pm
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    I do the sintering in my lab, actually. good, simple explanation! ( I work with different silica materials and not teflon, but the process is similar).

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  • November 19, 2017 at 12:31 am
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    I didn't like that hyperactive guy.

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  • November 19, 2017 at 6:37 am
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    Teflon is being phased out due to the fact that its cancerous matter in fact Teflon excess Teflon that didn't meet the standard of the only company that makes it got dumped into the Missouri river and now the river has to be cleaned up because even the fish in the river are cancerous now so go with a alternative like ceramic it will be better for your health folks.

    Reply
  • November 19, 2017 at 3:31 pm
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    This is got to be the shortest video I've seen in a long time!

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  • November 20, 2017 at 3:31 am
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    Teflon is also not biodegradable. This means that practically every human on Earth has some amount of Teflon in their bloodstream and it is NEVER coming out. Thus, teflon is a chemical weapon. They don't explicitly tell you on the product that if the teflon coating ever becomes damaged in any way that you need to dispose of the implement and get a new one. They SHOULD tell you though. However, in the process of telling you that they would be inadvertently admitting that it is dangerous to your health, which it is, as it is a foreign object that your body constantly attempts to attack, which causes cell replication and eventually, cancer.

    Reply
  • November 20, 2017 at 5:03 am
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    I gave up on Teflon years ago after going through so many of them, and now my ceramic frying pan I've had 6 years often using high heat and scraping that would ruin Teflon.

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  • November 20, 2017 at 5:09 am
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    teflon pans – butt cancer just a – waiting to happen.

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  • November 20, 2017 at 7:53 am
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    So nice not having to fast forward through ads! Thank you very much

    Reply
  • November 20, 2017 at 4:32 pm
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    Interesting that even though there are many local and national news reports about the toxicity of the chemicals used and payouts by Dupont for pollution this is a rather upbeat piece so we can rest assured at how great Teflon is and keep buying it.  Dupont should give you money for this so you don't need our money through Patreon.  I am sure there are other products with horrible consequences for those living near its manufacture that need some good advertising.  Ask those corporation for their money.

    Reply
  • November 20, 2017 at 8:31 pm
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    I have wondered about this question a number of times over the years. My assumption was mechanically roughing the surface, and possibly a chemical treatment. I am glad I was at least partially correct.

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  • November 20, 2017 at 9:17 pm
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    In the early 90's I wanted to see what happened when Teflon met superglue. But the most interesting finding was the label on the new pan: It was stuck, quite hard, to the Teflon. I peeled it off noting that the sticker was tough enough to pull hard without shredding it. But, the back of the now-free sticker felt only slightly tacky — less than a post-it note. My first assumption was that the adhesive was spent. But, accidentally reuniting them, I found that it still grabbed the Teflon quite fiercely!

    So, this adhesive is specific to Teflon and doesn't act sticky in the general sense.

    Though I must say, a sticker proclaiming "non stick" is rather ironic in two ways.

    Reply
  • November 21, 2017 at 7:07 am
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    32 morns gave it the thumbs down, 3k the thumbs up. Once again, intelligence wins.

    Reply
  • November 21, 2017 at 3:01 pm
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    which bonding method works best and who uses it?

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  • November 21, 2017 at 11:05 pm
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    Teflon – I've thrown out every pan I had that had teflon. Cast iron – when you're serious about cooking, and serious about not ingesting teflon.

    Reply
  • November 22, 2017 at 8:38 pm
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    How do they make other colors of teflon like metallic and red (I have pans with both)? And why is most teflon just black?

    Reply
  • November 22, 2017 at 9:34 pm
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    Interesting.

    Reply
  • November 27, 2017 at 1:05 pm
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    I wouldn;t like to be around when there's an accident in a Teflon lab

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  • November 27, 2017 at 7:58 pm
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    I bet it has something to do with taking steel pans and bash peoples teflon brains inn …(I must have forgot how to spell that.)

    Reply
  • November 28, 2017 at 1:22 am
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    is it true PTFEs can increase your risk of cancer? I imagine tiny bits of teflon can get into your food every time you use use it.

    Reply
  • December 4, 2017 at 4:36 pm
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    You should do a video on "why does every automated phone system say 'listen carefully as our menu options have changed'"

    Reply
  • December 7, 2017 at 2:04 pm
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    i sure hope you cover the c8 lawsuit

    Reply
  • December 9, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    0:14 simon, i suggest you lower the heat on that stove mate.

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  • December 27, 2017 at 7:21 pm
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    Ironic the ice cube comment. Most ice makers here in the US have a teflon coating. It wears down and the ice starts to build up and cause issues (the number repair call we get, well for the most part).

    Reply
  • January 26, 2018 at 9:46 pm
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    only a stoner would ask this

    Reply
  • August 2, 2018 at 8:24 am
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    Ready to watch another fascinating fact video? Then check out this video and find out about Forgotten History: Walter Hunt and the Safety Pin:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njPdhNKhZY8

    Reply
  • June 22, 2019 at 9:53 pm
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    I’ve never seen a Teflon pan until I went to my first gymnastics competition out of my town of Cypress, TX. It was in Reno, NV and the family I stayed with used them. I’ve always used cast iron.
    Before I left that family I gave them a nice 10” Field Company cast iron skillet.

    Reply

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