This is a stick insect.
It may look fairly conspicuous on my hand although I’ve made an effort to
make it feel at home with my shirt. But you’d have to see it in its really natural
surroundings in order to see it at its best. There it would blend in almost totally.
The attention to detail is astonishing, you can even see little
marks suggesting bark on its back. You could almost say that it fits its
environment like a key fits a lock. And I’ve got something else under my hat. This is a different kind of stick insect,
a leaf insect, it mainly resembles leaves dead leaves. You see how it rocks like
that I suspect that it’s got a second line of defense which is that when it’s
when it’s startled and when a bird might almost have got it it then I suspect
mimics a scorpion. You see how the tail has looped over the back there if I saw
that I might be momentarily startled thinking that it was a scorpion. Now lets put these away. And they have to call for a volunteer
who’s not frightened of stick insects. There we are. Thank you very much. [LAUGHTER] Brice and I are always doing
double acts like this. [LAUGHTER] [APPLAUSE]

How Stick Insects Use Camouflage – with Richard Dawkins
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16 thoughts on “How Stick Insects Use Camouflage – with Richard Dawkins

  • December 6, 2017 at 12:06 pm
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    Watch out Richard!, it might turn into a horse right in front of your eye!. pillock!.

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  • December 6, 2017 at 1:09 pm
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    Jolly good time

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  • December 6, 2017 at 1:10 pm
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    Hahah I guess now we know why they are called “stick” insects? Hhaha stick, amirite? Get it? Because they s… no? Ok.

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  • December 6, 2017 at 2:36 pm
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    I like these old segments. How about uploading the whole lectures if that's a possibility? That'd be nice.

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  • December 6, 2017 at 3:12 pm
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    they're not just good at camouflage but they're also good at hanging on

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  • December 6, 2017 at 3:32 pm
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    When my Mother was a primary school teacher in Fulham, she used to bring stick insects home from the school menagerie for term holidays, – the smaller ones than these, and they laid eggs – without having to 'mate' I seem to remember. Fascinating creatures!

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  • December 6, 2017 at 4:02 pm
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    Dawkins is such a gem. You can really see his passion for teaching biology and nature science to people.

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  • December 6, 2017 at 4:08 pm
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    The wonders of intelligent design!

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  • December 6, 2017 at 8:12 pm
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    Dawkins has the most scientific voice i have ever heard.

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  • December 6, 2017 at 10:30 pm
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    Colin has grown.

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  • December 6, 2017 at 11:14 pm
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    Didnt know you guys invented time machine

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  • December 6, 2017 at 11:49 pm
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    so…how?

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  • December 7, 2017 at 1:06 am
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    The guy was 50 here, and so handsome!

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  • December 7, 2017 at 3:42 am
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    Damn this is ooooold

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  • December 7, 2017 at 1:37 pm
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    Richard looks so young here! Of course, that was 26 years ago.

    If I saw one of these huge insects, let alone if one was crawling on me, I'd be shrieking like a little girl.

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  • December 7, 2017 at 1:52 pm
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    The stickiest situation since Sticky the Stick Insect got stuck on a sticky bun

    Reply

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