– Hey everyone, I wanna
talk to you a little bit today about foot protection
in sledge hockey. We get asked all the time
are players are wearing skate boots or are they
wearing running shoes. And the truth is that,
there is both out there. At the international level,
you’re required to have a certain level of foot protection. Most players do
wear skate boots and I’d always highly
recommend that because when you’re dealing with pucks being shot
and you just have nothing but an Adidas shoe
or a Nike blocking you, or in collisions with
the front of the sleds, it’s very easy to end
up breaking your foot or your ankle and
it has happened. So what I got with me today is I wanted to show you
my skate boots. There’s nothing too special
or particular about them but I just kind of tell you maybe
a little bit of history about them. And what make
mine unique for me and what you might
be able to think about that would work for you. What we got here is, I don’t even remember what
model these Bauers are. They’re literally from when I was
probably about 17 years old. My foot size hasn’t
changed and I just took the blades off myself. Now, one tip I would
give you right away is if you do have skates
and you’re gonna remove the blades yourself, I’d probably recommend
going to some kind of a shoe shop, see if they
can remove them for you. Or if there’s a hockey
shop that could help. Or if you have the option
to go buy skate boots without doing that yourself, then you can avoid
the problem I ran into. Because what I ran into is
the way I cut the rivets off, it broke the bottom
of the sole away and they started falling
apart very quickly. But because they
were already broken in, I wanted to keep them and I’ve had a
broken ankle before, so with my injury, it was
a lot more comfortable. Now, once you
get them cut off, on the bottom of mine,
I just bought some grip tape because I found when you
have just the hard plastic, all of a sudden, if you
decide to get in your sled on the ice, now it
becomes super slippery. So, this helps me from sliding
around a little bit more. And, you can see, there’s
just like many, many layers of hockey tape. I’ve had to like re-tape it,
pull it off, re-tape it ’cause it go so thick and heavy. And then the other
thing you’ll find, I can’t show too much of,
maybe, right now, you’ll notice with my friend Chris Dutkiewicz,
who’s a goalie, he’s got the side
of his cut out because, in our case, with
spinal cord injuries, I know for myself,
in particular, I have muscle
spasms in my feet that happen a lot when I play. So my feet are constantly
cramping up and releasing. Or my feet are jumping
inside of my skate boots. And so, I won’t be
able to, like I said, I don’t wanna shred
it too much, but I actually cut a whole side out of my skate boot and just taped it, so that
allows more room for my toes to move around but still offer the foot
protection I need in sledge. So, if you have the opportunity,
I’d highly recommend you get yourself a
pair of skate boots. They don’t need to be fancy,
they just need to work. And this way, you’ll not only
play with a lot more safety but play with a lot
more confidence and not worry about
having to break your foot. Hey everyone, thanks
so much for tuning in. It means the world to me if you
can leave comment below. Please tell me what we
can do differently. Any ideas for a future video. We’re putting out content
every single week here to educate people and let
people know more about how to play the sport
of sledge hockey. So please hit subscribe
here on YouTube. And if you would
like to learn more visit PlaySledgeHockey.com

SLEDGE HOCKEY | FOOT PROTECTION
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One thought on “SLEDGE HOCKEY | FOOT PROTECTION

  • February 13, 2018 at 8:07 am
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    Hi Kevin. thank you for all the videos. I've had my first experience last Sunday (11-02-2018) with sledge hockey (in the Netherlands it's called Para Ice hockey)

    Super excited about this sport!!

    Reply

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