36 thoughts on “WELDING POROSITY: Gas Coverage Vs. Tungsten Stick Out

  • May 4, 2019 at 12:42 pm
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    Open high pressure cylinders all the way? May be ok with shielding gasses, but in college, was taught to only open fuel gas or oxygen (which are high pressure arent they) only half a turn incase it needs to be closed in an emergency.

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  • May 4, 2019 at 12:57 pm
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    Any tips or tricks about welding with .045 wire on 3/16 mild Steel with 75/25 in all positions

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  • May 4, 2019 at 1:44 pm
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    You’re a Gotddanged hoot, Bob.

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  • May 4, 2019 at 1:57 pm
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    Never played with tungsten stickout and gas flow. But I had an idea about what it would do. Thanks for the content and keep it up Bob.

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  • May 4, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Yesterday I was doing some stick welding with my AHP Alphatig 200X. Set to DC, amps to about 80, stick mode etc. Couldn't get a weld going. Just little blobs and hard to start an arc. Reversed polarity and tried AC. Still bad. Then I noticed I forgot to disconnect the foot pedal. Duh! Love your videos! Thanks for all the great information!

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  • May 4, 2019 at 2:30 pm
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    Did he say Schleifwinkel? 😀
    Ah… my german heart is in joy! 😉

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  • May 4, 2019 at 5:08 pm
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    Nice video. Whats funny is that with a gas lens and #7 cup you could probably stick ur tungsten out an inch and a half and still get a decent weld. Another reason why i love gas lenses. Furick #8 for the win!

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  • May 4, 2019 at 7:58 pm
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    If you have a problem area on carbon steel where porosity is bubbling up and can't get a grinder on it steel use a dab of 300 series stainless and watch the porosity disappear. Old trick.

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  • May 4, 2019 at 7:59 pm
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    When you said “lovely” I thought I was watching a Trump interview for a sec lol

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  • May 4, 2019 at 7:59 pm
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    Good settings for 15psi , 5sec post flow , 135 amps for 332 , my preferred stick out is about 1/4 – 3/8 " , one thing I do is never touch the grounded point , instead I will hold the tungsten well behind the point and use my thump nail to set the stick out . Thanks for giving tips and tricks for people starting out , OG from the peanut gallery .

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  • May 4, 2019 at 9:01 pm
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    I can't remember the last time I DIDN'T use post flow..

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  • May 5, 2019 at 2:20 am
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    Thank You! Nobody has really talked about this stuff with the weird settings specifics.

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  • May 5, 2019 at 5:09 am
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    recently at work ive been able to use a new miller dynasty 400 id like to ask what are your ideas on arc control and electrode neg and electrode pos control

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  • May 5, 2019 at 7:10 am
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    F-ing arsome !! I have another question. What the [email protected]%@$ is causing my ark to shoot out at all sorts of weird places? I mean It does not come out of the point of the tungsten. It shoots out from the sides and [email protected] off to some random place on the work piece. It's more like a plasma ball toy than a welding scenario. Also the puddle seems to be lagging way behind to the point where I can't add filler without dipping into it. Please help. By the way I am talking about welding on the inside of a 90 degree corner join. I am an absolute noob in welding and am not sure why I keep trying the hardest stuff at this point but here I am.

    Also, you guys are the best!
    Thank you.

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  • May 5, 2019 at 6:22 pm
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    What pressure is your argon regulator set to?,

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  • May 6, 2019 at 3:19 am
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    Can you show how to tig into hard to reach areas? Can my tungsten be out super far if the gas is trapped in around the weld?

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  • May 6, 2019 at 3:22 am
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    Great tips. My nephew is always getting porosity in his welds when he borrows my everlast welder. Now instead of trying to explain to him myself I'll get him to watch your video.

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  • May 6, 2019 at 4:11 am
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    👍🤗

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  • May 6, 2019 at 11:04 am
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    Bob, I noticed you're using purple tungsten. I'm assuming it's triple-oxide? Am I the only guy left on the planet that still uses thoriated tungsten?

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  • May 6, 2019 at 8:58 pm
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    Preflow is a sham, just burp the pedal with the electrode away from the material, then begin welding anytime during the post flow.

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  • May 6, 2019 at 9:46 pm
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    The only time(s) i have used 30-35cfh of argon was welding outside (stainless pipe) when it was windy lg gaslense using a #8 or #7 cup, and to anyone that has or wants to learn tig pipe expeshaly stainless or other exotic metals scratch start will always leave a dark burnt area at the end of your weld where you snap out, you will never be fast enough to keep the shielding on the hot metal

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  • May 6, 2019 at 11:54 pm
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    Robert, I had a interesting experience as a novice TIG welder (4 months) and I thought for a new title for a video: Trouble shooting welding problems etc. and their solutions. Perhaps not minor picky problems but dramatic problems…. like a experience I had. I have a power tig 185 by everlast and it works just fine ; I've been concentrating on stainless steel 18 and 16 gauge. I started getting board with that and even worked with back purging with much success. I thought it was a good time to start learning AC aluminum welding. Watched a few YT vids and all went very well! (1/8 " 2×3 coupons and some inside and outside corners). That was a Thursday evening, and on Friday morning I sat down for some more practice…. I changed a tank of gas 80 size and…… what the hell, it would not even start a bead! Now as a beginner, I'm not thinking "bad gas" or mislabeled gas, but that was precisely what I had. We think it was mislabeled 25/75 Argon labeled as 100% argon! You can imagine what happened when trying to weld aluminum ; also, I did notice also that my colorful SS welds were now grey when I attempted them. In short, it would not weld Aluminum however! I'm thinking welder on the AC side, or perhaps….. I don't know what could have changed so suddenly? It was "all in the gas" . I just thought that other YT'ers and beginner welders would like to know that this DOES happen.

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  • May 7, 2019 at 12:02 am
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    Thank you thank you thank you I think I know everything there is about setting my stick out and my gas per pose flow.

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  • May 7, 2019 at 1:55 am
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    It's all about the gas flow! LOL. Excellent comparison of what the different settings will do. Would be great to see the same type of content with MIG and stick. amps too high, amps too low. wire feed too fast, wire feed too slow. well played Bob.

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  • May 7, 2019 at 3:01 am
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    Looking for a TIG welder for my metal shop. We have always been a light gauge shop and never needed to weld. Lately we have been getting into heavier metals and are getting request for welding. I’m getting tired of subbing it out all the time. All that being said I am NOT a welder, but need to learn and want a decent TIG welder that is simple to use for beginners, but something that we can grow into. 16 ga cold and stainless will be the most of the welding we do. On occasion, I will do some 3/16 Aluminum. Any suggestions on a reliable good machine without breaking the bank. Thanks

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  • May 7, 2019 at 4:43 pm
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    Can you do a video on how/what options to cut previous welds in thight spots ?

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  • May 7, 2019 at 8:38 pm
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    Great tutorials. Could you explain on the gasless mig on a later video I.e. incorrect settings.. thanks

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  • May 8, 2019 at 9:48 pm
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    Thanks, this made me realize that I was running just a bit too short of post flow. My tungsten was turning dark and I wasn't sure why.

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  • May 9, 2019 at 8:14 am
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    I have a question, hope you could assist.

    I bought some 309L stainless filler rods for TIG. I intend using them instead of mild steel rods for mild steel welding. This way my weld bead is stainless and corrosion resistant, even if the surrounding metal is mild steel.

    Do you see any problem with this?

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  • May 9, 2019 at 11:13 am
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    great lesson,, thanks

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  • May 10, 2019 at 8:12 am
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    I finally found something i am better than you at Bob. Shit welds!

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  • May 13, 2019 at 4:55 pm
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    I've seen loads of issues in regards to porosity & unfortunately the company I used to work for just turned a blind eye.. I was a Q/C technician & for weeks rejected components daily due to porosity. the company happily shipped items to the USA it was then found via goods inwards in the USA & a cost of shy $40K was made to correct such work.
    to this day the company continue shipping poor standards of product welded with missing welds, poor overlaps & porosity beyond words. the fabricators I used to work with simply didn't care, the company didn't care. as shown yes poor gas coverage is a main issue.

    overall anyone welding please take note of this video as it really does highlight the issue & cause of the problems

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  • May 18, 2019 at 12:55 am
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    So I should save maximum stick out for the bedroom? Good tip.

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  • June 26, 2019 at 8:17 pm
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    "Brown manky crap" lol

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  • September 16, 2019 at 4:59 am
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    Hey, Bob. Any tips for someone with a depth perception handicap? I'm teaching myself (with your help. Thank you) but I'm blind on my left side which makes it challenging to maintain arc length. Thanks for everything!

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